WOOD TRAINING BOXES. EASY & AFFORDABLE.

Before that magical bonsai tree of yours reaches the refinement stage, focus should be on growth and development. A shallow ceramic pot looks great, but may not be ideal for optimum growth. Wooden training boxes allow for bespoke dimensions to accommodate any size of tree. By allowing your tree to build up it’s resources and develop a strong(compact) root system, you propel it’s rate of growth, moving the tree ahead. There is good reason why bonsai professionals use boxes. Here are some benefits of using training crates.

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1. Build to size, any size. Finding the perfect dimensions in a training pot for your tree can be challenging. Make your box to any specs.

2. Inexpensive. Buy affordable planks of wood. Use wood you find or already have.

3. Easy to customize. Attach handles for large heavy trees. Fasten screws in the wood for guide-wire mounting points or tie-down wires to secure on the bench or railing.

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I WANT A BONSAI TREE. WHERE DO I START?

Here are 10 helpful tips on how to begin.

1. Determine the space or area you have for your tree(s). What is the light level like? Full sun, a few hours of sun, or bright shade? Heavily shaded or dark areas are not ideal for growing healthy bonsai.

2. Research tree species. Figure out which tree types will thrive in the space you have available. For example, Pines do best in sunny locations. Japanese Maples do best in part sun or bright shade.

3. When starting out, aim for specific species that are commonly used for bonsai. This ensures that you can find plenty of information on your tree. Plus you have a higher chance for success when developing your bonsai. Some plant material may be very appealing, but will not tolerate bonsai development techniques like root pruning or won’t reduce in twig and leaf size. This can cause some frustration… or just lead to a nice garden plant.

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A LOOK AT THE PENJING DEMO & WORKSHOP FROM SEPT 16th.

Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden in Chinatown is beautiful. One side is open to the public with no admission fee. It’s a calming oasis right in Vancouver. The other side which holds tours is open to garden members and the general public for a fee. If you haven’t seen either side of the garden yet, go, go!

The garden hosted a tour, demo and workshop on Saturday September 16th. Mr. Pin Lee was the penjing master on hand. He and another host took us on a quick tour around the garden. We saw penjing on display and heard some history of the ancient Chinese art form. Pin Lee was a delight to listen to. His warm energy was great to be around and his enthusiasm for penjing was as contagious as his smile. Continue reading